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Biology (BIO)

Business Administration (BSA)

 


BIO 101: General Biology (3 credits)

This course is designed to familiarize the students with three important aspects of biology at an introductory level. The first part deals with cellular organization: cell structure, chemical constituents, cellular respiration and photosynthesis, control of cellular activity, and the role of the nucleus and cytoplasm. The second part deals with basic concepts in genetics. The third part deals with biological activity at the level of the organism: structure and function of body parts, response of the organism to tits biological and physical environments, biological rhythms, and behavior. The process of evolution is also covered.

 

BIO 203 Cytology, histology and embryology (3 credits)

Prerequisite: BIO 101

This course is composed of 3 related sciences.  The first is structural and functional analysis of the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments of the cell with emphasis on the microscopic and submicroscopic structure of muscle, nerve, secretory and sensory ceils. Histology focuses on microstructures of the human body and their related functions, and is divided into general histology that studies the cell and intracellular matrix of the 4 basic types of tissue, and special histology that studies how the tissues constitute the organs in various systems. Embryology mainly concerns the developmental processes and mechanism of a human being, and is divided into general embryology that studies the formations and development of germ cells, fertilization and early development of a human embryo, and special embryology that studies the formation and malformations of different organs. The teaching program of cytology, histology and embryology includes lectures and laboratory practices.

 

BIO 217: General Plant Biology (anatomy and plant physiology)

(3 credits)

This course is the basic introductory lecture and laboratory course designed especially for Biological Sciences and Education Department majors. This course introduces the student to the basics of plant biology including plant anatomy and plant morphology, physiology, metabolism, reproduction and ecology. This course covers cell and tissue types, development of primary and secondary tissues, and structure of vegetative organs with emphasis on angiosperms. The course continues with an introduction to plant physiology of higher plants with emphasis on biochemical, cell biological and molecular aspects of how plants function. Unique aspects of regulation of plant metabolism including photosynthesis, respiration, growth and stress responses are emphasized. Introduces concepts of structure-function relationships, aspects of organismal maintenance, environmental response, growth, and reproduction are related to structure, and comparisons made between specializations in representative plants. The laboratory exercises are designed to study plant processes such as respiration, photosynthesis, tropisms, and secondary metabolite accumulation.

 

BIO 312: Systematical Botanics (3 credits)

This course covers basic and contemporary systematic principles and methods as applied to plants, including classification, identification skills, phylogenetics, and surveys of important families of major groups of plants via lectures and lab practice. The course continues with introduction to plant morphology including eukaryotic algae, fungi, bryophytes, and vascular plants to (typically) a phylum to ordinal level.  Emphasis is on comparative morphology and life cycles. The theoretical foundations of plant taxonomy and the types of evidences used in constructing plant classification and identification procedures are explained. Students are expected to achieve the following objectives after successfully completing the course: describe a plant using botanical terms, learn key characteristics for identification of important families of ferns, allies, conifers and other flowering plants, recognize large and common families of flowering plants. 

 

BIO 312: Systematical Zoology (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of the invertebrate and vertebrate animals, including sponges, cnidarians, flatworms, nematodes, annelids, mollusks, arthropods, echinoderms, minor protostome and deuterostome groups, invertebrate chordates, fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Lectures cover various aspects of the biology of animals, including animal classification and phylogeny, anatomical structure and function, behavior, biogeography and roles in the environment. Laboratory practical work emphasizes observation and investigation of living and preserved specimens, including some dissection. Independent projects are encouraged to improve research skills.

BIO 434: Molecular Biology (3 credits)

An introductory course covering the structure and properties of macromolecules, their interactions, organization of genes, ions chromosomes, replication and transcription of genetic material, protein synthesis and genetic engineering techniques.


BSA 101: Introduction to Business (3 credits)                                  

Prerequisite: None

A basic background for the various fields of business; a general survey of the entire field of economics, business and management in the free enterprise system; concepts of business and management functions, organizational considerations, and decision-making processes. Explores areas of specialization in the business world; exposure to business in small-medium-large organizations.

 

BSA 205: Computer Applications for Economics and Business (3 credits)               

Prerequisite: CMS 101

This is a practical course on how to use a computer, especially the personal computer, as an economic and business problem-solving tool. The course is based on tools provided by Microsoft Office and plenty of examples of economic and business problems.

 

BSA 210: Computer Applications in Business (3 credits)               

Prerequisite: CMS 101

This is a practical course on how to use a computer, especially the personal computer, as a business problem-solving tool. The course is based on tools provided by Microsoft Office and examples from accounting, finance and management courses.

 

BSA 215: Statistical Methods for Economics and Business (3 credits)      

Prerequisite: MATH 101

The course builds a foundation in statistics and develops applications of statistical tools to economic analysis. It includes: descriptive statistics, probabilities, estimation, and regression analysis. Cases and statistical packages support the course content.

 

BSA 250: Business Statistics (4 credits)                                             

Prerequisite: MATH 101

The course builds a foundation on statistics and develops applications to business decision making. It includes: descriptive statistics, probabilities, estimation, and regression analysis. The course also provides a set of skills for achieving and maintaining statistical process control methods and problem-solving tools. Cases and micro-computer statistical packages support the course content.

 

BSA 410: Business Analysis (3 credits)

Prerequisite: BSA 250, MATH 225

The course combines statistical analysis, modeling and decision making approaches. Topics covered are: data collection, processing, analysis and interpretation; modeling, simulation and decision analysis.

 

BSA 435: Taxation Policy (3 credits)                                                        

Prerequisite: LAW 305

The study of fundamental income tax problems in business, investments and personal decisions; tax problems arising for business, corporations; shareholder's tax problems; current trends in law and taxation policy; comparative analyses of different countries.

 

BSA 440:  Business Research

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

The course covers the main research tools applicable in applied business research. Basics of research problem formulation, research proposal, research design, different types of study, data collection and information sources, measurement, quantitative and qualitative data processing, hypothesis testing, data analysis, presentation and reporting, and ethics in business research are the main subjects of the course.

 

BSA 690: Information Technology for Decisions (3 credits)            

Prerequisite: BSA 210

The course has the main goal of providing students with applied knowledge in the use of information technology and systems in modern society, to learn how to make use of the most efficient programs in text processing, data management, spreadsheets and communications. Information nets, methods of information services in foreign trade, production management, the banking system (SWIFT), international tourism, and other topics will be examined.

 

BSA 880: Business Research Methods (3 credits)                              

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

The course covers the main research tools applicable in applied and theoretical business research. Research problem formulation, research proposal, research design, different types of study, data collection and information sources, measurement, quantitative and qualitative data processing, hypothesis testing, data analysis, presentation and reporting, and ethics in business research are the main subjects of the course.


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